solohawk

I am 18 and a practising falconer in the UK flying harris hawks.

totnoaa asked: Its not really an ask, but still.. I can see that you really love animals and care about them, but i don't know I still feel conflicted with what you do..I work at a wild animals hospital which our purpose is to take care of wild animals and bring them back to the wild.I really believe wild animals belong to the wild, and falconry isn't really my thing lets say that this way haha (against it). But probably it doesn't really matter, cause you will keep doing what you love and I'm nobody to you:)

zosci:

There is no reason to be against falconry… and I have to say I am surprised that a wildlife rehabilitator would feel that way (falconers have been critical to several rehabilitation facilities). Falconers are beneficial in endless ways; not just for wild birds, but in conservation, rehabilitation, environmental education, pest control, cultural enhancement, and more. Your comment in particular, “I really believe wild animals belong in the wild,” is a pointless worry. Those who take raptor from the wild, like myself, return them in a year or two as a stronger, smarter, more experienced animal. Those who take them as nestlings guarantee them a fat and happy life; nestlings that remain have a 75% chance of death within the first year.

I could sit here and write ten pages of why it is flat out silly to be against falconry, and I have, but there is no sense in repeating it here. If you (or any of my followers) would like more information, I would be happy to send you an essay I wrote a few months ago that outlines why falconry is not only not harmful, but wholly beneficial in several aspects. :)

P.S.- You are not nobody to me. Opinions matter. It is just heartbreaking to me that many people have ill-informed opinions… if you are still against falconry after hearing all of the arguments for it, then that is fine. But please give falconry more than a passing glance before initiating judgement.

rc-hawkeye:

cruelfeline:

G’day, tumblrites.

I don’t normally ask anyone to watch or sign anything with any sort of conviction, but this is probably the most abhorrent thing I’ve seen in a while. Handling birds by their legs. Treating them like paper airplanes during shows. Ignoring signs of distress. Teaching children that abuse is the proper way of doing things with these animals.

I used to work with a raptor program that rehabbed birds and gave educational talks. This is not how you handle a raptor. It is not even close.

These “educators” work as raptor rehabbers in Michigan… and their method of handling raptors is obscene. Every second these birds are shown is an obvious second of distress, fear, and abuse, and this shit needs stopping.

Michigan organizations have been contacted and are “working on it.” But maybe a petition would help them “work on it” faster. Either way, it can’t hurt.

So please pop over here and sign; this shit needs to stop, and it needs to stop as fast as possible.

Please reblog. Get this out there. We need to do everything possible to stop the torment these birds are being put through.

After watching a minute of the presentation, I am disgusted by their handling :(

solohawk:

Me and my young male Harris hawk, Solo in 2012. Well-loved and missed immensely…

Coming up to a year :(

solohawk:

Me and my young male Harris hawk, Solo in 2012. Well-loved and missed immensely…

Coming up to a year :(

Spencer ferret having his time out this afternoon. Now that summer’s just around the corner, he’ll be retired from work and spending his days playing and sleeping with a run in the fields of an evening. What a life. 

Photo’s taken by myself :) 

My Harris surprised me by taking a bath today - he’s a prolific paddler but rarely takes the plunge. He then sat out in the almost-there-kind-of-weak sun, drying off and being all sweet and tweety. Did I mention we have down coming off him and  that ONE body feather dropped yesterday? That’s right, it has begun. 

howtoskinatiger:

hardxsun:

It frustrates me when people try to justify hunting as ‘just another sport’. Hunting is not a sport - hunting is what we did before there was sport. It is much more primal and basic - it can be suppressed, diverted or ignored - but it still exists.

Early humans evolved to be hunters and gatherers for millions of years and humans as we know it now have only spent the last ten thousand years (approximately) practicing agriculture and animal husbandry. In a timeline of human evolution, civilisation and agriculture are not much more than the blink of an eye (furthermore, civilisation is entirely unsustainable). If you consider Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, the innate drive to produce food is one of our most basic physiological requirements - sports only began to evolve as our basic needs were satisfied by agriculture and civilisation and humans had to find things to fill our spare time with.

I refuse to bow to the notion that I have to justify my activities - there is nothing more natural than being out in the bush chasing game (whether it’s with bow, dog or firearm). People like to criticise modern hunting and claim that the true hunter should be capable of running down a full grown deer and taking it with their bare hands - that’s how humans started hunting (that’s why humans can run marathons and have a heat regulating system, allowing them to outrun even the fastest game) and pretty soon found that it was more efficient to use a pointed stick. Firearms are just at the end of a long line of human technological evolution. I temper my drive to hunt with the utmost respect for the game pursued, whether it be a humble rabbit, feral pig or majestic stag. Just because it is one of our basic urges, it doesn’t mean it has to be inhumane or unethical. Firearms allow me to pursue the most basic of human urges, and ensure that the animal will undergo the least amount of suffering. Hunting, to me, should be both human and humane. It should heighten the senses, lead us to appreciate our own mortality and teach us to respect all creatures - big and small.

In my opinion, football, cricket and volleyball are sports - hunting is what it means to be human.

This!

I don’t understand people who hate on using firearms and would rather see an animal killed in a slow and painful way just because they consider it to be more ~natural~. Fact is, using advanced tools IS natural to our species. Many species create and use tools and some of these species, including crows, are known to constantly redevelop and improve their tool designs. That is exactly what we’ve done, just to a much higher level, using our knowledge to create tools that are as quick and efficient and possible. This is something we should be proud of!

If you’re going to kill something then it’s your duty to do so in as humane a way as possible, and thanks to firearms we are able to do that. 

lis890 asked: You have a beautiful harris! :D And what a great name! I have to say it's lovely to see a young woman into falconry proudly blogging about it and sharing photos. My male, Steve, started moulting a bit early this year and in the past I've never really made blogs or taken photos of his progress, but I must say you have inspired me to start for the next season. Do you want to fly any other BoP? and what are you studying in college?

I kept an online journal religiously over the course of the 2012-13 season with my young male but this year I’ve just not had the time! I love to take lots of photos and document my hawk’s progress, and blogging is a great way to present my own experiences. I love that your hawk’s name is Steve :D Mine’s named after Arnold Schwarzenegger (not by me!  the little fellow is a hand-me-down) and my young male last season was called “Solo”. I’ve been lucky to have experience with a variety of birds but Harris’ hawks hold a special spot in my heart and always will. I will always fly one! However I would love to fly a sparrowhawk or goshawk in a few seasons and would love to fly a Common Buzzard or American Kestrel for the pleasure in it. I live by the rule that a bird that comes to me is with me for as long as I can do it justice and I wouldn’t take on more than one serious hunting bird so the gos and spar may be a few years coming, but I don’t mind. I’m only young I suppose! I’m studying Animal Management at college and am in my first of two years. It’s particularly stressful and the workload is fairly gigantic but I wouldn’t change it for the world. What do you fly? I love meeting other falconers :) 

Arnie, this evening, out on the lawn. Having finished up our season a couple of weeks ago Grumbles has now been fed up and is about two and a half ounces over flying weight. He’s an absolute bugger when fat so I won’t be pushing him up much higher and certainly not before he starts dropping feathers. 
I am currently writing up my reflections on the season and I’ll be sharing that report as and when it’s completed - college work isn’t half getting in the way!

Arnie, this evening, out on the lawn. Having finished up our season a couple of weeks ago Grumbles has now been fed up and is about two and a half ounces over flying weight. He’s an absolute bugger when fat so I won’t be pushing him up much higher and certainly not before he starts dropping feathers. 

I am currently writing up my reflections on the season and I’ll be sharing that report as and when it’s completed - college work isn’t half getting in the way!